Tending the Holy

Tending the Holy: Spiritual Direction Across Traditions by Norvene Vest

In this provocative and cutting-edge collection readers are given the opportunity to see what spiritual direction looks like–and what questions are asked–through a variety of lenses. From an examination of the spiritual direction relationship in the Evangelical Christian tradition, to Buddhism and Hindu ones, to the better-known ones of the Benedictines, Carmelites, and Ignatians, and finally, to the contemporary lenses of feminism, Generation X, the institutional perspective, and even one based on the natural world and the spirituality of St. Francis, this collection explores unexplored territory. Tending the Holy is an important resource for spiritual directors and pastoral counselors.

Reviews

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“Although this book is more for the pastoral counselor or spiritual director, it is a wonderful series of essays for those of us interested in learning more about how we as humans encounter the living God and share the spiritual journey with one another. Tending the Holy is filled with more than just information on various expressions of spiritual direction across many traditions, it holds within its pages an opportunity to learn something new about the spiritual connections we have with the person sitting in the pew next to us on Sunday morning, as well as the person sitting across from us on Trax.”

Dialogue, July 2004

“The text is a valuable resource for those wishing to broaden their insights into basic concepts of traditions other than Christianity, for those who are participants in spiritual direction training programs and want introductions to some classic paths, and for those who want to reflect on recent developments and social concerns. The text can also help an individual seeking a language and tradition in which to express his or her own spiritual experience. Given the caliber of writing and content of these essays, one can hope that subsequent volumes including additional spiritual traditions will follow.”

Joy Milos, CSJ, Associate Professor of Religious Studies,
Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA.