Bernadette Flanagan

Bernadette Flanagan

City: Dublin

State: Outside U.S. and Canada

Languages: English

Personalized Affiliation: Interspiritual

Spiritual Spheres: Eco/Nature-based

Category: Spiritual Director, Offers Graduate School Credit

Email: marybflanagan36@gmail.com

Phone: 0872033006

Website: http://www.spiritualityinstitute.ie

Focus Area: Corporate/Workplace, Ecospirituality/Nature-based, Education, European Cultures, Homeless/Low Income, Immigrants/Displaced, Women's Issues

Social Media: Linkedin

Profile: I have worked in contemplative studies, spiritual accompaniment and intuitive research for 30 years. My love of the Irish language and my indigenous Celtic heritage has drawn me into exploring the soul spaces in the Irish landscape which nurtured the great abbesses who established homes for the soul that were centres of contemplative spirituality for more than a thousand years. My book, Embracing Solitude focuses on the interior turn to women-led monastic movements and scans the Christian tradition for women who have made this turn in various epochs and circumstances. New Monasticism is a movement assuming diverse forms in response to the turn to classical spiritual sources for guidance about living spiritual commitment with integrity and authenticity today. Genuine spiritual seeking requires the cultivation of an inner disposition to return to the room of the heart. The lessons explored in this book from women spiritual entrepreneurs across the centuries will benefit contemporay New Monastics--both women and men. My book has inspired, challenged, and guided those who follow in the footsteps of the renowned spiritual innovators profiled in it. In the book, I seek not merely to uncover forgotten stories of women's spirituality and prophetic voices, but to probe the reasons for tradition's lack of attention to transformative solitude, intentionally chosen. I explore how from the desert of fourth-century Africa to the woods of contemporary America, women's choice of solitude offers new landscapes of the sacred--in ordinary life, in new forms of community, and in exploring mystical processes of inner transformation. The book has spoken to the deepest longings of spiritual seekers today. It answers many of their questions, places them in a historical context, and, most of all, encourages them on their pilgrimage into the heart of Divine Mystery through a mysticism embodied in a shared spiritual solitude, which can be maintained in the midst of the ordinary and the everyday. Just as spiritual seekers moved from the city to the desert in the third century, I have explored, within my own experience how now the move is back to finding contemplative solitude in the midst of the commerce of the city. In Ireland I connect with contemplative companions through walking native ancient pilgrim routes; particularly the Dublin Camino which is quite managaemable in a 3/4 time frame.. The retrieval of these ancient pilgrim paths across Ireland is attracting large cohorts of diverse people who recognise that the ancient forms of spiritual practices in Ireland have something to offer today’s new journey. Interviews by media broadcasters with a sample of today's pilgrims reveal that they recognise that while contemporary society has its faults, there is also a new attentiveness to global concerns and a quest for deeper attunement, however, fleeting.